Skip to main content

About your Search

20130104
20130112
STATION
CSPAN 20
LANGUAGE
English 20
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the 1700's which nobody would have ever predicted would end slavery 100 years later. the civil rights movement ups and downs. i think that it is important to always know that social movements are not simple narrative of arcs of one of success after another. it is not about occupying space. it is about confronting the enormous challenges we face in america and the globe. if we do not confront of these changes, we will not have a future. one way of thinking about maybe the history of the abs and a -- ebbs and flows of social movement is to say -- for those who write the demise of this movement, which there is always a gap or you can have hope. that is the importance of the beginning of the occupy movement. it actually is a source of hope that people responded to the changes in this country that really show that there are cracks that can be exploited. and i will stop. thank you. >> ok. >> nadine. >> she actually took my answer. [laughter] that's what i was going to say. so, there is some good overlap. i guess i will talk a bit about my experience with occupy and start off with a general
which nobody would have ever predicted would end slavery 100 years later. the civil rights movement sought ups and downs. i think that it is important to always know that social movements are not simple narrative of parks of one of success after another. -- arcs of success after another. it is not about occupying space. it is about confronting the enormous challenges we face in america and the globe. if we do not confront of these changes, we will not have a future. one way of thinking about maybe the history of the abs and a flows of social movement is to say -- for those who write the demise of this movement, which there is is always a gap or you can have hope. that is the importance of the beginning of the occupy movement. it actually is a source of hope that people responded to the changes in this country that really show that there are cracks that can be exploited. and i will stop. thank you. >> ok. >> she actually took my answer. [laughter] that's what i was going to say. so, there is some good overlap. i guess i will talk a bit about my experience with occupy and start off wi
starting point is where people are. it may be that labor is a spent force and that civil-rights organizations are spent forces and the community-based organizations are narrow minded and too anxious to just get a foundation grant for government low-income tax credit to build five units of housing and it will not change the system, but that is where people are. for the last four years i have been working with the building insurance, the widest part of the labor movement. i have been working with them to try and get a young black and latino kids of color into the building trade so that they can become the green work force of the future. the building trade, conservative as they are, operates 1200 job training centers in the construction trade and is the second-largest mechanism outside the navy. guess what? they are actually in a coalition with youth bills, with many other organizations that train high-school dropouts, inner-city kids, working together for the last four years to say -- how do we change and improve? the national leadership of the building trade has gone across 350 c
into enforcement to the extent that a lot of advocates, particularly civil rights advocates, are actually very angry about it. it's never going to be perfect. i think that that's the place where the last comment that you read comes forward. we still have people who do constantly believe that a lot of them are criminals, drugging drugs or people. nobody wants that. so the question is, how much more needs to happen on the border and inside the united states before other kinds of reforms can happen? i believe that what the administration has been trying to say for the last two years is we've done that. look at the number of people we deported, something like 400,000 people, which is more than any president ever has in the last, you know, in all of history. the border is looking much better. i've been down, i've looked at it, it's looking better, but there are still problems. the question is, is it ok? that's going to be -- there's going to be competing versions of that no matter what happens. host: here are some of those numbers. on u.s. immigrant deportations, you can see the total so far during
various views with legal and justice organizations. civil rights organizations, participation in national service organizations from one club to the rotary club. youth groups, campus groups, peace groups. gun safety advocates from the brady group to the major gun safety organizations. the educators that are groping for answers, the mental health community including the american academy that we have been through, it is not an extensive study. but the literature that the staff has been working. much of what we already had, trying to devour. the most interesting meeting is with an interfaith group. not only the traditional mainstream protestant churches, the catholic council of bishops, but evangelicals. they are reluctant to engage in is because it is may be an attack on a cultural thing related to gun ownership and the like. all these groups with the muslim community, the hindu community, etc.. it was really a fascinating discussion. and then we matt with sportsmen groups that is distinct from but do not disagree with the gun owner groups. they have a different perspective that includes th
administration has now restored the civil rights of more virginians than any other administration in the history of virginia. [applause] here is the plan. here in virginia, in the cradle of democracy, we enact policies that actually work. in washington, we see debt, taxes, delays, blank, and this function. but here in virginia, we see results, solutions, job growth, surpluses, and cooperation. what a difference 9 miles can make. -- 90 miles can make. virginia is ranked as america's most livable state and the best day in which to make a living. i think you will know that every other major national business publications puts virginia in the top three best states in which to do business. while that is all good, there are many areas of believe we must play a much stronger foundation for the future of our commonwealth. this session, i am asking you to work with me to get a few big things done that i believe will create more jobs and more opportunities for our people. when you leave here on time, in 45 days, i want to be able to report to our citizens that our schools are on the way to being the most
of people because it is the civil right to. amnesty would be general, and only by this amnesty we can get into national reconsolation, when everyone forgives everyone else. these are the main features of the political solution, as we see it. these are only just the headlines that need details, which the government will begin to put details and expand on these points and put this vision in the form of an initiative. this would be followed up in accordance with the way it is laid down. we need to put every topic in its context. we live in times of falsehood and manipulation. this is something we do not do. it is done by them. we need to put these things in the right context and put the right definitions. some, when they see this vision, they think there is a return backwards from the security point of view. i would like to reassure everybody, as far as fighting terrorism, we will not stop fighting terrorism as long as we have even one single terrorist in syria. this does not mean we're going to lessen the fight on terrorism. [applause] [chanting] secondly, this vision, you could call it ini
people are. it may be that civil rights organizations are spent forces. and maybe that trinity based organizations are narrow minded and to anxious to get the income grants and to build five units of housing. that is not going to change the system. that is where people are. for the last four years i've been working with the building trades. i have been working with them to the young black and latino kids of color into the building trade so they can become the workers. as conservative as they are, that operate 1200 job training centers in the construction grade. it is the second-largest job training mechanism outside the u.s.. guess what? there in a coalition filled with many other organizations that train high-school dropouts working together for the last four years to say "how do we change, how do we improve?" the national leadership has gone across 350 cities in u.s.. try to convince them that they need to change. this is encouraging. i think we have to do that kind of work. i think people like me would be justified in writing this people off. in order to change america and need th
. maybe that labor is a spent force. it may be that civil rights organizations are spent forces. maybe that community-based organizations are now reminded into anxious to just get up foundation grant or a government no income tax credit to build five units of housing, and that is not going to change the system. but that is where people are. and that is where i start. for the last four years, i have been working with the widest, most conservative part of the labor movement. i have been working with them to try to get young black and latino kids of color into the building trades so they can become the green work force of the future. the building trades, spent as they are, conservative as they are, operate 1200 job training centers in the construction trades and it is the second-largest job-training mechanism outside of the u.s. navy. and guess what? they are actually in a coalition with youth build, with many other organizations that train high-school dropouts, inner-city kids, working together for the last four years to say, how do we change? how do we improve? the national leadership o
pleased to announce that our administration has now restored the civil rights of more virginians than any other administration in the history of virginia. [applause] here is the plan. here in virginia, in the cradle of democracy, we enact policies that actually work. in washington, we see debt, taxes, delays, blank, and this function. function.\and dys but here in virginia, we see results, solutions, job growth, surpluses, and cooperation. what a difference 90 miles can make. [applause] virginia is ranked as america's most livable state and the best state in which to make a living. i think you will know that every other major national business publications puts virginia in the top three best states in which to do business. while that is all good, there are many areas where i believe we must play a much stronger foundation for the future of our commonwealth. this session, i am asking you to work with me to get a few big things done that i believe will create more jobs and more opportunities for our people. when you leave here on time, in 45 days, i want to be able to report to our citizens
forfeit its rights. however, we cannot give amnesty on behalf of people because it is the civil right to. amnesty would be general, and only by this amnesty we can get into national reconsolation, when everyone forgives everyone else. these are the main features of the political solution, as we see it. these are only just the headlines that need details, which the government will begin to put details and expand on these points and put this vision in the form of an initiative. this would be followed up in accordance with the way it is laid down. we need to put every topic in its context. we live in times of falsehood and manipulation. this is something we do not do. it is done by them. we need to put these things in the right context and put the right definitions. some, when they see this vision, they think there is a return backwards from the security point of view. i would like to reassure everybody, as far as fighting terrorism, we will not stop fighting terrorism as long as we have even one single terrorist in syria. this does not mean we're going to lessen the fight on terrorism. [ap
top-down pressure. sometimes it happens by movements like civil rights moment or right to vote for women in this country and sometimes it has to come from top down change. when that top down change is perceived to be efficiently enforced, then the exploiter has to adapt. what you see with forms of slavery today there are laws, there are penalties. by in large they are not perceived to be effectively active and enforced so the exploiter does not have to adapt too much or adapt just enough to avoid identification. >> thank you for a stimulating presentation. i want to get your reaction to the idea in general terms that maybe the diagnosis is only as good as the remedy it prescribes. in a particular way of asking that question, i would like to hear you say what your study on the shrimp supply chain suggests about an appropriate remedy for the exploitation that we're seeing there. and secondly, in more conceptual terms, all related to remedies. if you excuse me asking more than one question relating to different parts of your presentation. secondly, whether in conceptual terms it m
, fight. we are millions of people just like you. we are the longest standing civil rights organization in the u.s. of history's s patriots, prbotectors of the second amendment advocating the right to keep and bear arms. advancing the shooting sports. championing gun safety, education and training. creating a vital legacy by answering freedom's call. and we are growing stronger every day. we are the n.r.a. and the n.r.a. is you. host: that is from the n.r.a. two stories you can find online and front page of the leading newspapers. "new york times" looking at symbols of grief piling up. from the "washington post" broad strategy on guns being weighed far beyond the ban on assault weapons. they are on their websites. we will continue the conversation on the agenda ahead as lawmakers return the start of the 113th congress. president back in washington later t today. later, looking at just what members of congress earn, pensions and salary. we will have more with daniel shuman of the sunlight foundation. keeping track of other programs. good morning, nancy. >> good morning, steve. on today's
produce, it is a little murky. i'm not so sure whether you are concerned about the civil rights of the prisoners or the fact that guantanamo bay itself is something the u.s. should not keep open. -- listening to you, it is a little murky. so my question, is it closing guantanamo bay or giving justice to the people and the 186 people? when you go on that track, and everybody loses track of what is really the issue. >> i don't understand the distinction. it's not just to hold people indefinitely without. guantanamo is the symbol of that. you've got to get them out of there and close it. >> i don't want to get in an argument. >> your first point about the cost, not the economic cost that you can put a dollar figure on but the cost to america, the intangible cost. i think we saw that not long ago with the man extradited from the u.k. to america. i guess the u.k. is our closest allies in the war on terror and our closest ally made us promise that before they would extradite him we would not send them to guantanamo, that he would not be prosecuted in the military commission, which to
and defenders associations, prosecutors. we met with civil rights organizations. we met with national service organizations. kiwanas, rotary international. we have met with youth groups. we have met with gun safety advocates. yesterday that meeting took place here. also come up a dozen other organizations -- also, a dozen other organizations. and we met with educators and parents from the school boards to the state school offices and associations. again, the governors of thoseand maybe one of the most important things we have been focusing on is the mental health community. the american academy for childhood and adolescence psychiatry, the national counselor community of behavioral health centers. there is a perspective among health providers that mental illness is a major component. and yesterday, we finished up on in this room with about 17 members of the faith community, which in all the years i have been doing this, the first time there has been overwhelming consensus on the evangelical groups nationwide. particularly those from the rural areas. the national catholic conference of bishops
like civil rights movement or getting the right to vote for women in this country, and sometimes it has to come from top-down change. when that top-down change is perceived to be efficiently enforced, then the exploiter has to adapt. what you see with forms of slavery today there are laws, there are penalties. buy and large they are not perceived to be efficiently enforced, so that the exploiter doesn't have to adapt too much or just enough evade identification. >> thank you for a stimulating presentation. i want to get your reaction to the idea in general terms that maybe the diagnosis is only as good as the remedy it prescribes. as a more particular way of asking that question, i'd like to hear you say what your study of the shrimp supply chain suggests about appropriate remedy for the exploitation that we're seeing there. and secondly, in more conceptual terms, all related to remedies. if you excuse me asking more than one question relating to different parts of your presentation. secondly, whether in conceptual terms it might not make more sense to draw a line between slavery and ot
more fire men and civil workers down here. he needs to go and go fast. host: maxine offering her political opinion. guest: first and foremost, you are right, ohio eliminated its estate tax. it used to have an exemption of only about $385,000, one of the lowest in the country's estate death taxes. but ohio is one state that is repealing its estate tax. here in our neck of the wisdom of virginia no longer has an estate tax, while the district of columbia and maryland do. as a result, people are moving from d.c. and maryland, crossing the potomac river and taking up residence in virginia in anticipation of the death and estate tax. as far as income tax in ohio, you have township taxes in addition to the state income taxes. there is a very interesting wrinkle or sometimes it is better to file separate then -- separate than file joint returns. host: "the new york times" has a piece that talks about the high earners, but it says the legislation approved by both houses of congress would increase taxes on people with incomes that are not quite as high as well, because the bill includes l
that any kind of technology that was around when you were born is right and natural. is in the natural order of things. anything that comes along and around the age of 35 is fascinating and exciting and brilliant. anything that comes along after that is best to civilization and is going to destroy humanity as we know it. i think i am very lucky in having the job that i do, because i don't have the leisure to be incredibly blessed doubt it for my childhood. that was a world that i was not part of an was unlikely to ever be a part of. the kind of coverage that we get from anybody with a cell phone, all over the world, sullivan unreliable, is still astonishing and necessary. you brought up the arab spring. it brought up real-life coverage of hurricane sandy. it is everywhere we need to be, to paraphrase some advertisement or other. it is a great, wonderful new world. the big difference is that you as the news consumer have to do the work they did not have to do before. you have to choose your pension plan, your healthcare plan, paper or plastic. you have everything thrown in your lap, and
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)